Essex Rivers Hub

River Lea or Lee River Roding Cobbin’s Brook River Stort River Beam River Rom River Ingrebourne Mardyke Stanford Brook Pitseahall Fleet River Crouch River Roach Upper Thames Estuary Lower Thames Estuary Crouch/Roach Estuary Blackwater Estuary Colne Estuary Hamford Water Holland Brook Sixpenny and Tenpenny Brooks Lower River Stour Upper River Stour River Colne Roman River Bourne Brook River Blackwater River Pant River Brain Pod’s Brook River Chelmer River Ter River Can River Wid Pincey Brook River Cam Stour Estuary

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Roll over the map to highlight a river or estuary, click to view a detailed map of the projects.

Latest news

The benefit of Rural Sustainable Drainage Systems to reduce flooding

The Stroud District Council recently produced an informative film detailing the technical principles of Natural Flood Management on small streams and their catchments. Various techniques and designs are explored, with the aim of maximising benefits for biodiversity and water quality, whilst reducing the risks of flooding. The film can be found here, in the 'Videos' section of the Essex Rivers Hub.

The return of the lamprey

The elusive sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, is perhaps the oldest known vertebrate, without having changed much in the last 360 million years. As with many other species, human activity has had negative impacts on their reproductive behaviour and thus their population in many habitats. However, lampreys are beginning to reappear in the Great Ouse, Trent, Derwent and Wear rivers due to conservation efforts to retain their status.

You can read more about these fascinating creatures here, in an interesting article published by the Guardian. 

What is the Water Framework Directive?

The problems and threats facing our rivers have been recognised at a European level, by the Water Framework Directive.

This is a piece of European legislation which became UK law in 2003. It states that all waterbodies (including rivers, lakes and the sea) in the UK must reach 'good ecological status' by 2027. 'Good ecological status' means they should be clean and healthy and contain the 'right' type and number of animals and plants. The UK has a legal obligation to meet this target.

Some projects require hands-on, practical, help. If you can give your time and fancy getting involved with practical work in and around a river, this could be for you! We will post information on the contacts page as projects require help. Typical things may include:

Himalayan Balsam pullers

Mink raft checkers and water vole surveyors

Submit Records

River Wardens

Riverfly Monitors

Website key stakeholders:

Environment Agency logo      Essex Wildlife Trust logo            Essex Biodiversity Project logo

Design by LTD Design Consultants and build by Garganey Consulting based on an original concept by Herts and Middlesex Wildlife Trust