Essex Rivers Hub

Tenpenny Brook Pressures

The table below shows the current pressures that this waterbody faces and the solutions that could be put in place to solve these problems. You can learn more about some of these pressures and solutions on the Environment Agency Catchment Data Explorer or you can contact us to find out more.

PRESSURES

SOLUTIONS

New Zealand Pigmy Weed has been most recently recorded on this water body in 2008 . This plant forms dense mats in waterways, increasing the likelihood of flooding and also out-competing native species.

This plant can be mechanically removed, but this would only be a short term solution. Chemical eradication is possible and if done correctly can be very effective. After eradication it is important to monitor sites to ensure that it does not take hold again.

 

Fish populations are not as high as would be desired. One cause could be restricted fish passage caused by mill structures along this brook.

Determine what actions, if any, are need to reduce the impact.

Fish populations are not as high as would be desired. One cause could be restricted fish passage caused by mill structures along this brook.

Investigate if barriers are impacting on fish passage.

This water body has seasonal low flows, which can have an impact on dissolved oxygen levels in the local area.  

Ensure that abstractions are not having an impact on flow.

Phosphate levels are high in this water body resulting in a classified of bad for phosphate. There are many causes but point source causes are sewage discharges from sewage treatment works, businesses and private houses.

Dissolved oxygen levels fluctuate and although there is no WFD failure for this, levels do drop in late summer and early autumn. One of the reasons for this is like the increased plant growth, which is exasperated by the increased nutrient levels in the water from phosphate.

Investigations to confirm failure and the cause of these failures – likely source.

Re-assess location of existing sampling point and add an additional sample point upstream to compare results and ensure dissolved O2 results are correct.

By choosing sampling points that are representative of the majority of the waterbody.

 

Phosphate levels are high in this water body resulting in a classification of bad for phosphate. There are many causes but the impact from agricultural runoff in the upper reaches is one of the causes for the high levels.

Dissolved oxygen levels fluctuate and although there is no WFD failure for this, levels do drop in late summer and early autumn. One of the reasons for this is most likely the increased plant growth, which is exasperated by the increased nutrient levels in the water from phosphate.

Investigations to confirm failure and the cause of these failures – likely source.

Re-assess location of existing sampling point and add an additional sample point upstream to compare results and ensure dissolved O2 results are correct.

Choosing sampling points that are representative of the majority of the waterbody.

 

 

  

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